Wednesday, July 24, 2019

The Success of Saudi Economic Policies According to Islamic Financing Literature review - 1

The Success of Saudi Economic Policies According to Islamic Financing Principles - Literature review Example The structure of society in Saudi Arabia is a monarchy, which means that patriarchal values of hereditary power are enshrined in all the internal political organisations. It is not like the monarchy which exists in the UK, where the Queen has a largely ceremonial role, but rather it is a non-democratic institution where the ruling royal family occupy the positions of power and decision-making. King and Prime Minister Abdallah bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud have been both chief of state and head of government since 2005, and all members of the council of ministers are appointed by him. (CIA, 2010) Female members of the Royal family and other respected women can and do occupy prominent positions with impressive job titles such as Princess Dr al-Jawhara bint Fahd al-Saud who was an undersecretary for education for women's colleges and Dr Nora Alyousuf, who is one of only six state-appointed â€Å"parliamentary advisors† but their powers are limited and many people view these appointment s as a cosmetic touch to distract from the lack of influence that Saudi women have in society. It would be wrong to assume, however, that royal power is always used to oppress women in modern Saudi Arabia and in fact over the last ten years there have been a   number of royal decrees which call for the setting up of organisations which review and reform Saudi social and political structures. The royal decree of March 9, 2004, called for the establishment of an Institution for Human Rights and another one of Sept.12 2005 set up an official Saudi Committee for Human Rights.  The structure of society in Saudi Arabia is a monarchy, which means that patriarchal values of hereditary power are enshrined in all the internal political organisations. It is not like the monarchy which exists in the UK, where the Queen has a largely ceremonial role, but rather it is a non-democratic institution where the ruling royal family occupy the positions of power and decision-making. King and Prime M inister Abdallah bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud have been both chief of state and head of government since 2005, and all members of the council of ministers are appointed by him. (CIA, 2010) Female members of the Royal family and other respected women can and do occupy prominent positions with impressive job titles such as Princess Dr al-Jawhara bint Fahd al-Saud who was an undersecretary for education for women's colleges and Dr Nora Alyousuf, who is one of only six state-appointed â€Å"parliamentary advisors† but their powers are limited and many people view these appointments as a cosmetic touch to distract from the lack of influence that Saudi women have in society. It would be wrong to assume, however, that royal power is always used to oppress women in modern Saudi Arabia and in fact over the last ten years there have been a   number of royal decrees which call for the setting up of organisations which review and reform Saudi social and political structures. The royal decre e of March 9, 2004, called for the establishment of an Institution for Human Rights and another one of Sept.12 2005 set up an official Saudi Committee for Human Rights.  

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